Omamori (charms, amulets and talisman)

Charms, amulets and talisman are various objects of luck. In all countries around the world many people use charms to bring them good luck, or to avoid bad luck. In Japan, for example, they are called omamori. Please realise, these are old traditions, and not everybody believes them completely.

Countries like Australia, England and America have some common charms. They may be worn around your kneck or around your wrist or kept in your wallet. Sometimes they are hung on the wall or a door, or in your car. Below are a few common charms:

rabbits foot/ 4 leaf clover/ crucifix/  horse shoe/ piggy bank/ Saint Christopher medal/ wish bone/

rabbit’s foot

rabbit foot

Tradition says, for real good luck, you must have the left hind (back) foot of the rabbit.

 

 

 

 

4 leaf clover

four-leaf-clover

This is actually a type of rare plant; 3 leaf clovers are very common but 4 leaf clovers are not found so often. So, they are considered to be special. Tradition says the 4 leafs mean faith, hope, love and luck.

 

 

 

 

 

crucifix

crucifix

This is the main symbol of the Christian religion. But even non-Christians believe that the crucifix keeps away evil things.

 

 

 

 

 

 

horse shoe

horse shoe

Tradition says you must hang it on the door with the ends pointing upwards not downwards.

 

 

 

 

piggy bank

piggy_bank1

Usually made of ceramics or porcelain. Piggy banks were very popular in old times before ATMs and credit cards. They were used to teach children the importance of saving money. But they also are thought to bring good fortune to people.

 

 

 

 

Saint Christopher

saint christopher

He was a Christian holy person who did a lot of travelling. So people wear his charm around their kneck to protect themselves when they need to travel anywhere.
wish bone

wish bone

This is a bone which comes from a chicken. After eating a roasted chicken one person usually ends up with this bone. You must wait for the bone to get very dry. Make a wish, then 2 people use their pinky (smallest finger) to break the bone. The one with the largest piece of broken bone will have his wish come true.

 

 

 

Websites
http://www.lifepaths360.com/index.php/lucky-charms-and-talismans-in-history-and-across-cultures-9609/
http://www.calastrology.com/good-luck-charms.html?gclid=CNbkkqSkgbsCFUZapQodvh0Aeg

This website is a bit poppy/commercial! But has brief outlines of many different charms

 

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